Brave New Home

creating authenticity where it matters most

Indoor Plant Report Card

5 Comments

I like plants, I really do.  Is the feeling mutual?  Meh, not so much.  Soon after shooting my top of the stairs vignette, my peace lily started peacing out.

I thought it’d be fun to share what indoor plants I currently have, how well I’m doing at keeping them alive, and open a discussion about which indoor plants are the most resilient.  Let’s start by setting the bar low so I can work my way up.peace lilly
Peace lily.  Grade: D
I’ve only had this plant for a few weeks but I’ve quickly reached the point of trying anything to resuscitate life back into it.  I bought this plant for a windowless bathroom (since it is a low light plant after all) but moved it out to a spot with some indirect light to give it a fighting chance.  I think this is about my third time killing owning one of these.        fiddle leaf fig Fiddle leaf tree.  Grade: C-
Oh, Fiddy.  I bought you with the best intentions and with every hope of growing you into a big, beautiful, glorious tree.   I’m considering moving Fiddy to a spot away from the window (which we keep mostly closed during the day) to see if she’ll thrive better elsewhere.close up fiddle leaf figI have a leaf fall off ever now and then but haven’t had any new growth so I’m giving myself a C- for barely maintaining the status quo.sansevieriaSanservaria aka Snake Plant.  Grade: B+
When I started reading up on how to take care of this plant, almost all directions boasted that it thrives in neglect.  I think sometimes I’m guilty of giving a plant too much attention (that’s possible, right?  we’re not talking babies here…) so even that seemed like a challenge.  So far, so good.  I’ve had new growth but a few leaves fall out but I think more new growth on the whole.  So for me, that garners a good grade.pothos on book shelfPothos.  Grade: A
I saved the best for last here.  This is the one and only plant I feel I’ve really mastered taking care of.  I water these once a week and set them outside for some air and sun and they grow and grow.  They’ve even lived to tell of a great mealybug attack!
pothos on top of fridgeThe thing is, I’m not crazy about the way they look.  I’d prefer a plant with a little more height and maybe visual interest.  But since it’s the one plant I know I can take care of, it’s my go-to plant.

I’m anxious to know, what is your go-to house plant?  Know of a plant that can live in a windowless room?  Any tips for any of the plants here?

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Author: Jennifer @ Brave New Home

Hi! I'm Jennifer from Brave New Home (www.bravenewhome.com). I blog about overcoming fear and transforming a house into a home one DIY project at a time.

5 thoughts on “Indoor Plant Report Card

  1. I do have good track record with indoor plants. mos to of my plants thrive on pure neglect. Some have even been stressed so much that I water them only when I see them wilt. the problem that i have in our current house though is that we have too much light! My lucky bamboo and a fern almost died before I realized it was a case of too much of a good thing. I have moved them away from sunlight and they seem to be slowly inching back to life. After seeing how fussy the fiddle leaf figs have been with most of the bloggers I’m on the fence about getting one.

  2. The only plant I have been able to keep alive is my money tree, Paul. I figured giving it a name would help me keep it alive longer so far so good. I thought Paul was actually a Ficus but soon learned the tag he came with was wrong. My mom got me Paul when I moved into my first apartment 4 years ago. The money tree is great indoors but I always make sure he is by the window but not getting too much sun or heat. He gets brown leaves sometimes but I just think of it as growth. This is such a fun blog post. :)

  3. I kill any plant in my path/surroundings. Despite my best intentions, I do not have a green thumb (black thumb?).

  4. The last plant, I have had the original one my parents had in their youth and I’ve propagated it for friends as part of house warming gifts forever. You can’t kill that plant if you try (and I’ve tried).

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